foodmuseumguy:

UK Food Heritage Site: Leed’s R. Boston & Sons
“This early 1900s image shows Boar Lane the home of Leeds most stylish shops, including Mr Richard Boston & Sons, a great fruit, game and fish market used by those wishing to avoid the larger markets located opposite Holy Trinity Church. The store was described in Waddington’s 1894 Guide to Leeds as providing fifty varieties of fish including Oysters, every bird imaginable, thirty six varieties of vegetables, one hundred sorts of fruit and ‘…a selection of luxuries too numerous to name and a business-like briskness in attention to the smallest order are within the customers reach’.
The shop front displays fresh poultry while the staff stand gathered at the front. Above the shop sign a coat of arms and flags are displayed. Mr Richard Boston (1843-1908) was a member of Leeds Council for twelve years and an elected member for the Headingley Ward in 1891.” (Source)

foodmuseumguy:

UK Food Heritage Site: Leed’s R. Boston & Sons

“This early 1900s image shows Boar Lane the home of Leeds most stylish shops, including Mr Richard Boston & Sons, a great fruit, game and fish market used by those wishing to avoid the larger markets located opposite Holy Trinity Church. The store was described in Waddington’s 1894 Guide to Leeds as providing fifty varieties of fish including Oysters, every bird imaginable, thirty six varieties of vegetables, one hundred sorts of fruit and ‘…a selection of luxuries too numerous to name and a business-like briskness in attention to the smallest order are within the customers reach’.

The shop front displays fresh poultry while the staff stand gathered at the front. Above the shop sign a coat of arms and flags are displayed. Mr Richard Boston (1843-1908) was a member of Leeds Council for twelve years and an elected member for the Headingley Ward in 1891.” (Source)

(Source: kitschyliving)

ourpresidents:

President Truman with United Nations Cake
Birthday cake presented to President Harry S. Truman (center) by members of the National Citizens Committee for United Nations Day. The cake is to celebrate the sixth anniversary of the United Nations. The cake is made from a recipe of Mrs. Bess Wallace Truman’s that is in the United Nations cookbook, sponsored by the Committee. 9/12/51

ourpresidents:

President Truman with United Nations Cake

Birthday cake presented to President Harry S. Truman (center) by members of the National Citizens Committee for United Nations Day. The cake is to celebrate the sixth anniversary of the United Nations. The cake is made from a recipe of Mrs. Bess Wallace Truman’s that is in the United Nations cookbook, sponsored by the Committee. 9/12/51


collective-history:

Japanese-American grocery store trying to show where they stand the day after Pearl Harbor, Dec 8 1941

collective-history:

Japanese-American grocery store trying to show where they stand the day after Pearl Harbor, Dec 8 1941

(via jeanfivintage)

"The oldest continuously-operating, family-owned ranch honored by the Nevada Centennial Ranch & Farm Program is the Cushman-Corkill Ranch in Churchill County.  Josiah Cushman purchased the 1,700 acre ranch on the Carson Sink in 1861 where Fallon is today.  “Cushman was known for his high-quality cattle and a ‘fine-bearing orchard’,” according to the 2004 award narrative, “and eventually served as County Clerk, 1872-1874.”  Following the completion of the Newlands Reclamation Project in the first decade of the twentieth-century, the family raised alfalfa, corn, potatoes, Sudan grass, and small grains."

Via Nevada Culture

"The oldest continuously-operating, family-owned ranch honored by the Nevada Centennial Ranch & Farm Program is the Cushman-Corkill Ranch in Churchill County. Josiah Cushman purchased the 1,700 acre ranch on the Carson Sink in 1861 where Fallon is today. “Cushman was known for his high-quality cattle and a ‘fine-bearing orchard’,” according to the 2004 award narrative, “and eventually served as County Clerk, 1872-1874.” Following the completion of the Newlands Reclamation Project in the first decade of the twentieth-century, the family raised alfalfa, corn, potatoes, Sudan grass, and small grains."

Via Nevada Culture

saisonciel:

July 1936. “Interior of migratory fruit worker’s tent. Yakima, Washington.” Photo by Arthur Rothstein for the Resettlement Administration.

saisonciel:

July 1936. “Interior of migratory fruit worker’s tent. Yakima, Washington.” Photo by Arthur Rothstein for the Resettlement Administration.

laughingsquid:

Katz’s Delicatessen



“In 1888 what is now known as Katz’s Delicatessen was established on Ludlow Street in New York’s Lower East Side by the Iceland brothers. Upon the arrival of Willy Katz in 1903,
the name of the store was changed from Iceland Brothers to Iceland & Katz. Willy’s cousin Benny joined him in 1910, buying out the Iceland brothers to officially form Katz’s delicatessen.”

laughingsquid:

Katz’s Delicatessen

“In 1888 what is now known as Katz’s Delicatessen was established on Ludlow Street in New York’s Lower East Side by the Iceland brothers. Upon the arrival of Willy Katz in 1903, the name of the store was changed from Iceland Brothers to Iceland & Katz. Willy’s cousin Benny joined him in 1910, buying out the Iceland brothers to officially form Katz’s delicatessen.”
Since 1935, the Clam Box. The building itself was constructed in 1938. It’s in Ipswich, Massachusetts.

Since 1935, the Clam Box. The building itself was constructed in 1938. It’s in Ipswich, Massachusetts.

foodmuseumguy:

Hubig’s Pies Factory, a New Orleans food heritage site that survived Katrina was lost to a fire Friday. This is the kind of community food landmark that are part of all our lives. This blog and the projects of The Food Museum are dedicated to calling attention to them. The New York Times reports:

The local love for Hubig’s, he said, is “part of the code” of living in New Orleans, which treasures fancy restaurants like Galatoire’s and po’ boy sandwich joints. “They love Hubig’s pies as much as they love bananas Foster,” he said. It’s the catholic embrace of high and low, and a sensibility that says too much ain’t enough. Most of all, it’s a love of tradition in a place with hundreds of years of history and a long history of loss.

Charles Parent, the fire chief, recalled in an interview with the television station WDSU that the company gave unsold pies to firefighters and police officers in the chaotic days after Hurricane Katrina, and so they felt the loss keenly. “Our guys put this out with their tears,” he said.

For now, New Orleans is without its little pies. Hubig’s fans sought out their treats in every gas station and supermarket where they are sold. “We opened up at 6, and I would say they were gone by a quarter of 7,” said John Serpas, manager of the Harrison Grocery in the Lakeview neighborhood. The woman who bought the last two pies, he said, took the box, with the legend “A New Orleans Tradition.” She said, “This might be worth some money later in life.”  Read more

image of factory

image of pie



foodmuseumguy:

Here is another community food heritage site that is endangered. Memories of this place go back a long time.
Gray’s Store in Adamsville village brought in customers for years with its old-fashioned marble soda fountain, cigar and tobacco cases, and Rhode Island johnny cakes. The 224-year-old business may be the oldest operating general store in America, although others have staked similar claims.
The Rhode Island store near the Massachusetts line opened in 1788. Now owners say this year is its last. Gray’s is set to close Sunday afternoon. Owner Jonah Waite inherited the shop after his father died of cancer last month. He said Saturday it was a hard decision to close the store and leave behind all the history, but the shop’s finances aren’t sustainable and a supermarket down the street has siphoned away business.
The new owner’s great grandfather owned the store in the early 1900s and ran a gristmill to make his own corn meal that he sold in the store. In 2007, U.S. Sen. Jack Reed and then-Gov. Donald Carcieri issued proclamations naming Gray’s as the oldest continuously run general store in the country. More customers than usual have been gathering at Gray’s in recent days to say farewell and share memories, Waite said. Bob Wordell, a mechanic down the street, remembers gathering at the store in the summer with his friends when he was a child years ago. “We’d eat freeze pops on the front steps,” Wordell told The Providence Journal. “I think they cost a nickel.” Read more

foodmuseumguy:

Here is another community food heritage site that is endangered. Memories of this place go back a long time.

Gray’s Store in Adamsville village brought in customers for years with its old-fashioned marble soda fountain, cigar and tobacco cases, and Rhode Island johnny cakes. The 224-year-old business may be the oldest operating general store in America, although others have staked similar claims.

The Rhode Island store near the Massachusetts line opened in 1788. Now owners say this year is its last. Gray’s is set to close Sunday afternoon. Owner Jonah Waite inherited the shop after his father died of cancer last month. He said Saturday it was a hard decision to close the store and leave behind all the history, but the shop’s finances aren’t sustainable and a supermarket down the street has siphoned away business.

The new owner’s great grandfather owned the store in the early 1900s and ran a gristmill to make his own corn meal that he sold in the store. In 2007, U.S. Sen. Jack Reed and then-Gov. Donald Carcieri issued proclamations naming Gray’s as the oldest continuously run general store in the country. More customers than usual have been gathering at Gray’s in recent days to say farewell and share memories, Waite said. Bob Wordell, a mechanic down the street, remembers gathering at the store in the summer with his friends when he was a child years ago. “We’d eat freeze pops on the front steps,” Wordell told The Providence Journal. “I think they cost a nickel.” Read more