laughingsquid:

Katz’s Delicatessen



“In 1888 what is now known as Katz’s Delicatessen was established on Ludlow Street in New York’s Lower East Side by the Iceland brothers. Upon the arrival of Willy Katz in 1903,
the name of the store was changed from Iceland Brothers to Iceland & Katz. Willy’s cousin Benny joined him in 1910, buying out the Iceland brothers to officially form Katz’s delicatessen.”

laughingsquid:

Katz’s Delicatessen

“In 1888 what is now known as Katz’s Delicatessen was established on Ludlow Street in New York’s Lower East Side by the Iceland brothers. Upon the arrival of Willy Katz in 1903, the name of the store was changed from Iceland Brothers to Iceland & Katz. Willy’s cousin Benny joined him in 1910, buying out the Iceland brothers to officially form Katz’s delicatessen.”
nypl:

You’ll be able to see an actual Automat machine at our new exhibition, Lunch Hour NYC, opening June 22!!
apossiopeza:

Automat, 977 Eighth Avenue, Manhattan. by New York Public Library on Flickr.
Man takes pie out of Automat, stone counters and walls below metal and glass display.

nypl:

You’ll be able to see an actual Automat machine at our new exhibition, Lunch Hour NYC, opening June 22!!

apossiopeza:

Automat, 977 Eighth Avenue, Manhattan. by New York Public Library on Flickr.

Man takes pie out of Automat, stone counters and walls below metal and glass display.

(via )

cavetocanvas:

Walker Evans, Untitled (Lunchroom Window, New York), 1929
From the Metropolitan Museum:

As early as the 1870s, the quick-lunch counter had become commonplace in New York City. With the introduction and success of the coin-operated automat in the 1910s, lunch and coffee could be had in a New York minute. Walker Evans discovered this trio of natty, pre-stock market crash consumers near Grand Central terminal at a lunchroom at the corner of Lexington Avenue and 44th Street.









cavetocanvas:

Walker Evans, Untitled (Lunchroom Window, New York), 1929

From the Metropolitan Museum:

As early as the 1870s, the quick-lunch counter had become commonplace in New York City. With the introduction and success of the coin-operated automat in the 1910s, lunch and coffee could be had in a New York minute. Walker Evans discovered this trio of natty, pre-stock market crash consumers near Grand Central terminal at a lunchroom at the corner of Lexington Avenue and 44th Street.

(via )

Hey, don’t believe your eyes. New York’s McSorley’s Old Ale House most likely did not exist until 1862, and it did not admit women until 1970. Yep, a Men’s Bar.

Hey, don’t believe your eyes. New York’s McSorley’s Old Ale House most likely did not exist until 1862, and it did not admit women until 1970. Yep, a Men’s Bar.